Dentistry in India

Dentistry in India: Boom or Bust Business?

According to global statistics, the dental market in the world is growing steadily for the last five years. The major bulk of the market expansion is attributed to Asian countries, where India is said to be the forefront of this progress. As a matter of fact, dentistry in India is so huge that it will become the single largest nation market for dental services, products, and materials. Having said that, the dentistry in India faces a serious challenge; that is, the oral health care awareness in the Indian population is decreasing. This leads to the shrinking of the demand in dental services. You can click here to know more about figures and statistics about this decline. This begs us to the question, is dentistry in India a boom or bust business?

Dentistry in India: Boom or Bust Business

Over the last decade, India has become an international destination for medical treatment and services, including dental procedures. As per the recent government data, dental tourism accounts for the tenth of India’s medical tourism. And this number is seen to grow in the coming years.

Dental procedures and services in India is fairly cheap in contrast to its Western counterparts. For instance, a dental filling in the United States or in Europe ranges from $300 to $400. But in India, you can undergo a dental filling treatment for 20 bucks. Basically, you can avail the same services using state of the art equipment and technology at a very reasonable price.

The burgeoning population of India is a good sign that the demand for dental services will always be there. In fact, an increasing number of higher learning institutions are offering programs to accommodate the current and future needs of dentistry in India.

Challenges of Dentistry in India

  • Oral Care Infrastructure

Almost 99 percent of the dental service providers in India are private entities. There are a few multinational companies that have an active presence in the country’s dental market. After earning their degrees, dentists in India set up their own clinics, where most can be found in the city. The challenge about the infrastructure of dentistry in India is the competition. Each year, at least 200,000 students graduate from dental schools. And with the declining awareness in oral health care in the country, the supply of dental practitioners in the country will surpass the demand.

  • Marketing

Some dental practitioners see having a website as an effective marketing tool, which is good. However, most of them fail to look after the website and maintain it. Creating a website requires a lot of time and effort. Ideally, it will take a year, utmost, to evaluate and assess how the website contributed to the practice’s marketing efforts.